Cancel vs Close: Design to Distinguish the Difference

Long ago, the symbol X meant “this is where the treasure is buried.” In today’s digital interfaces, X no longer marks the spot, but rather functions as a way for users to cancel a process or to dismiss an interim screen. How can one tell for sure whether the X means cancel or close? Sometimes

Cancel vs Close: Design to Distinguish the Difference
What B2B Designers Can Learn from B2C About Building Trust

A widespread misconception with business–to–business (B2B) sites is that they are immune to rules and usability standards that apply to ecommerce on business–to–consumer (B2C) sites. In fact, B2B design teams should account for their users’ needs and follow usability principles to address customer concerns and build trust. The business professionals who use B2B sites also

What B2B Designers Can Learn from B2C About Building Trust
Text Scanning Patterns: Eyetracking Evidence

On the web, people  don’t read every word on a page; instead, they scan. They naturally attempt to be efficient and put in the least possible work for achieving their goal. They have learned that scanning can deliver almost the same amount of information as reading, but with significant less time and effort. Scanning Patterns

Text Scanning Patterns: Eyetracking Evidence
Large Devices Preferred for Important Tasks

If your product supports activities that users might consider of high importance (finance or healthcare, for example), check your analytics. What proportion of your users are mobile? If the volume of your interactions on mobile is low, definitely avoid a mobile-first strategy. You still need a mobile presence, but that likely shouldn’t be your design team’s top priority. If you’re unsure which tasks your users consider important, run a diary study asking people to rate various activities by importance. This methodology will also allow you to get more context from users as to why they

Large Devices Preferred for Important Tasks
Setup of an Eyetracking Study

During each session, the participant (right) completed tasks using what looked to her to be a normal monitor. Meanwhile, the screen was shared on the facilitator’s screen with real-time gaze data. The facilitator (me, left) monitored the gaze calibration, watched user behavior, and administered tasks and instructions as needed. I also took some notes, but as eyetracking facilitation requires multitasking through many activities, those notes were very light. Primarily, I used my notes to record any issues I saw in the gaze data or to remind myself to go back and rewatch particularly

Setup of an Eyetracking Study



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