Dot Voting: A Simple Decision-Making and Prioritizing Technique in UX

There are few UX-workshop activities that work well in any situation. Dot voting is one of them.  Dot voting is a simple tool used to democratically prioritize items or make decisions in a group setting. It is an easy, straightforward way to narrow down alternatives and converge to a set of concepts or ideas.  Definition

Dot Voting: A Simple Decision-Making and Prioritizing Technique in UX
The Attention Economy

Users also learn to conserve their attention in subtle ways. Banner blindness, the tendency to ignore advertisements when placed in the right rail or at the top of the page, is an example of adaptation that appeared in response to a wealth of information. Users have also adapted to the barrage of notifications common on mobile devices: they have learned to ignore many of them. During a recent usability testing session, I watched a woman browse for new podcasts on her iPhone. When the first notification of the session went off, she apologized to me and asked “Can you still use this recording

The Attention Economy
Popups: 10 Problematic Trends and Alternatives

From conducting decades of user research, we know that people dislike popups and modals. I was reminded of this fact during a recent usability study. While attempting to complete a task, a participant tossed his phone across the table after encountering multiple popups, consecutively. Frustrated, he abandoned his task and left the website with a

Popups: 10 Problematic Trends and Alternatives
Store Finders: Why People Still Need Locator Links

A store locator (or store finder) is a website (or app) feature that allows customers to find physical outlets of a retailer — or of any organization with real-world locations that people may need to visit. But, today, with the prevalence of external tools such as Google Maps, many users turn to them for location-related

Store Finders: Why People Still Need Locator Links
Accot-Zhai Steering Law: Implications for UI Design

When designing other UI elements that involve path-steering tasks, such as sliders, scrollbars, and video playback heads, remember that users will have a hard time achieving precision with such controls. Therefore, for precise tasks, supplement these UI elements with other secondary controls that support precision. When using a slider to select a parameter value, use the slider as a coarse control (for reaching the general desired region), and provide a secondary fine control (such as numeric input box with stepper buttons) to choose a specific value. Also, allow users to click anywhere on

Accot-Zhai Steering Law: Implications for UI Design



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