E-commerce
Text Scanning Patterns: Eyetracking Evidence

On the web, people  don’t read every word on a page; instead, they scan. They naturally attempt to be efficient and put in the least possible work for achieving their goal. They have learned that scanning can deliver almost the same amount of information as reading, but with significant less time and effort. Scanning Patterns

Text Scanning Patterns: Eyetracking Evidence
E-commerce
Large Devices Preferred for Important Tasks

If your product supports activities that users might consider of high importance (finance or healthcare, for example), check your analytics. What proportion of your users are mobile? If the volume of your interactions on mobile is low, definitely avoid a mobile-first strategy. You still need a mobile presence, but that likely shouldn’t be your design team’s top priority. If you’re unsure which tasks your users consider important, run a diary study asking people to rate various activities by importance. This methodology will also allow you to get more context from users as to why they

Large Devices Preferred for Important Tasks
E-commerce
Setup of an Eyetracking Study

During each session, the participant (right) completed tasks using what looked to her to be a normal monitor. Meanwhile, the screen was shared on the facilitator’s screen with real-time gaze data. The facilitator (me, left) monitored the gaze calibration, watched user behavior, and administered tasks and instructions as needed. I also took some notes, but as eyetracking facilitation requires multitasking through many activities, those notes were very light. Primarily, I used my notes to record any issues I saw in the gaze data or to remind myself to go back and rewatch particularly

Setup of an Eyetracking Study
Usability
Nielsen’s Law of Internet Bandwidth

Starting about 2003, high-end users will have speeds corresponding to a personal T–1 line (1.5 Mbps). This will allow them to download pages in less than a second, meaning that they will be able to navigate the web freely. The user experience will become radically more gratifying with subsecond response times. Of course, low-end users will still have slow speeds in 2003, so high-end users’ megabit access will still not sanction bloated design. Looking even further ahead, Nielsen’s law does predict that the web will be 57 times faster in 10 years (2008). At that time, even low-end users will

Nielsen’s Law of Internet Bandwidth
Security
Is Business Headed for a Cognitive-First Future?

As the world generates more and more data — at a clip of 2.5 quintillion bytes each day — it simultaneously struggles to manage it. With humans unable to manually process such large amounts of data and analyze its implications, the business world has to turn to machines to take on some of the load. Smart





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