Nielsen’s Law of Internet Bandwidth

Starting about 2003, high-end users will have speeds corresponding to a personal T–1 line (1.5 Mbps). This will allow them to download pages in less than a second, meaning that they will be able to navigate the web freely. The user experience will become radically more gratifying with subsecond response times. Of course, low-end users will still have slow speeds in 2003, so high-end users’ megabit access will still not sanction bloated design. Looking even further ahead, Nielsen’s law does predict that the web will be 57 times faster in 10 years (2008). At that time, even low-end users will

Nielsen’s Law of Internet Bandwidth
Better Link Labels: 4Ss for Encouraging Clicks

This routing page on gov.uk contains links related to births, deaths, marriages, and care. Each link completely describes the most important content it will lead to. Each link in this list fully contains the most important content that users will find if they select it — for example, Marriage, civil partnership, and divorce. The descriptive text beneath this link is useful, but entirely supplementary: Includes getting married abroad, decree absolutes, and looking after children. The text is useful because it clarifies and expands the range of topics that will be found at that link. However

Better Link Labels: 4Ss for Encouraging Clicks
‘Our Users Are Everyone’: Designing Mass-Market Products for Large User Audiences

When a design serves a large and varied population of users, stakeholders sometimes direct that the design must target “everyone.” This approach may feel more inclusive than focusing on certain categories of people, and is especially attractive for organizations that have a strong need to attract more customers or users. But avoiding any definitions of the target audience actually leads to a less usable experience for most people. Without an understanding of who the users are, you risk getting biased research findings and incoherent design choices. You don’t always need precise

‘Our Users Are Everyone’: Designing Mass-Market Products for Large User Audiences
Design Thinking 101

History of Design Thinking It is a common misconception that design thinking is new. Design has been practiced for ages: monuments, bridges, automobiles, subway systems are all end-products of design processes. Throughout history, good designers have applied a human-centric creative process to build meaningful and effective solutions. In the early 1900’s husband and wife designers Charles and Ray Eames practiced “learning by doing,” exploring a range of needs and constraints before designing their Eames chairs, which continue to be in production even now, seventy years later. 1960’s

Design Thinking 101
Tesla’s Touchscreen UI: A Case Study of Car-Dashboard User Interface

Within a given menu, the most commonly used options should be the easiest to access. Yet, Tesla’s decisions with respect to the ordering of the controls in the menu are at best dubious. The first option is the access to all the car’s settings and customizations — something that is unlikely to be used often while driving.  The rear-view camera (an essential feature in a car whose rear-windshield view is partially blocked by the backseat headrests) is available under the arrow menu, as is the cell phone. And these arguably frequently used options are not even given priority in that menu

Tesla’s Touchscreen UI: A Case Study of Car-Dashboard User Interface



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