Nielsen’s Law of Internet Bandwidth

Starting about 2003, high-end users will have speeds corresponding to a personal T–1 line (1.5 Mbps). This will allow them to download pages in less than a second, meaning that they will be able to navigate the web freely. The user experience will become radically more gratifying with subsecond response times. Of course, low-end users will still have slow speeds in 2003, so high-end users’ megabit access will still not sanction bloated design. Looking even further ahead, Nielsen’s law does predict that the web will be 57 times faster in 10 years (2008). At that time, even low-end users will

Nielsen’s Law of Internet Bandwidth
Better Link Labels: 4Ss for Encouraging Clicks

The CONTACT labels on Africa Odyssey’s site accurately communicate what the user will find when clicking the button. When links set expectations that aren’t met, they slowly corrode the user’s trust in the site and the organization it represents. Wasted clicks rapidly make users cut their click budget for your site or even leave your site. Substantial Remember that users scan rather than reading the UI in its entirety. We know from eyetracking research that people tend to pay more attention to salient elements — links that are styled differently (as they should be) from the static

Better Link Labels: 4Ss for Encouraging Clicks
‘Our Users Are Everyone’: Designing Mass-Market Products for Large User Audiences

When a design serves a large and varied population of users, stakeholders sometimes direct that the design must target “everyone.” This approach may feel more inclusive than focusing on certain categories of people, and is especially attractive for organizations that have a strong need to attract more customers or users. But avoiding any definitions of the target audience actually leads to a less usable experience for most people. Without an understanding of who the users are, you risk getting biased research findings and incoherent design choices. You don’t always need precise

‘Our Users Are Everyone’: Designing Mass-Market Products for Large User Audiences
Design Thinking 101

History of Design Thinking It is a common misconception that design thinking is new. Design has been practiced for ages: monuments, bridges, automobiles, subway systems are all end-products of design processes. Throughout history, good designers have applied a human-centric creative process to build meaningful and effective solutions. In the early 1900’s husband and wife designers Charles and Ray Eames practiced “learning by doing,” exploring a range of needs and constraints before designing their Eames chairs, which continue to be in production even now, seventy years later. 1960’s

Design Thinking 101
Tesla’s Touchscreen UI: A Case Study of Car-Dashboard User Interface

So, if people end up doing the same task faster, it’s good, right? Well, it would be if this solution was guaranteed to work correctly in all circumstances. In fact, Tesla warns against relying solely on lane assist for lane changes. Even barring sensor errors (which are more common than one would expect), it can be challenging to interpret the displayed information correctly. The problem is that the user may not recognize to what lane the lane-assist cues apply. To understand why, imagine that you are driving on a three-lane road and you want to switch lanes from the rightmost lane to the

Tesla’s Touchscreen UI: A Case Study of Car-Dashboard User Interface



UsabilityBlockchainBrandingDesignE-commerceOthersProductsSecurityStartups

Usability | Dancing in the Co-Economy: Are you Square Dancing or Foxtrotting?