10 Usability Heuristics Applied to Video Games

Subway Surfers, an endless-runner mobile game, does a nice job crafting error messages. After users lose mid-game, they’re prompted with a dialog that reads, Save me! (Which would not be a good dialog prompt in a productivity app, but is acceptable in the playful context of a game.) To continue the game from the point at which they lost, users can either watch an advertisement or use game Keys (a type of game currency). If the user attempts to use Keys but does not have enough, an error message appears.  The error message uses simple language to diagnose the problem (Not enough keys

10 Usability Heuristics Applied to Video Games
Split Buttons: Definition

In complex applications, it is easy to overwhelm users with a tremendous number of options, commands, tools, and controls. Showing a large number of tools all at once is visually overwhelming, and evaluating all the available actions places far too much cognitive load on users. Split buttons reduce visual complexity by grouping similar commands together

Split Buttons: Definition
Touch Targets on Touchscreens

For example, the David Yurman jewelry website included small circular swatches under each product photo on product-listing pages, to indicate alternate colors available for each. Clicking each swatch would update the product photo on the page, so users could preview the color without navigating to the detail page. While this design worked well for mouse-based interactions, the small swatches were far too small (only 1mm or 0.04 inches) for tablet users — attempts to tap a color swatch often activated the link to the product-detail page instead. Perhaps they were left visible just so users

Touch Targets on Touchscreens
6 Rules for Persuasive Storytelling

In this article I define “audience” as anyone who is being told the story — including multidisciplinary-team members, stakeholders, clients, third-party partners, and so on. Our goal when telling stories is to resonate with our audience, but it’s difficult to do it when we do not speak its language. Understand the industry and terminology of your audience and incorporate these words into your story so they can put themselves in it. For example, if your audience is a client in the manufacturing industry using an assembly-line process, you should know about the machinery being used, the

6 Rules for Persuasive Storytelling
3 Design Considerations for Effective Mobile-App Permission Requests

What Are Permission Requests and Why Have Them? An app must request permission before accessing resources such as the camera, current location, or microphone, on the user’s mobile device. The app sends (via the operating system) a request in the form of a modal dialog, asking the user to grant or decline access. Google Translate

3 Design Considerations for Effective Mobile-App Permission Requests



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Usability | 7 Business Killers — Thoughts Startups Ought to Consider